The Fashion of The Grammys

Beyonce

There were French robots (dressed in both black and white), Miss Bey sporting a see-thru white lacey Michael Costello (not to mention the super fetish look she sported on the show’s opening song), Madonna in a Ralph Lauren suit (but why the cane?) sporting a gold “grillz” on her upper teeth (huh?) and Pharrell Williams’ hat taking up all manner of vertical space, plus all the usual wackiness in fashion as well as music at The Grammys this past Sunday.

You have to love these award shows as much for the red carpet walk-in taking place hours before the actual show as for what happens during the broadcast of award giving-outting and mash-up music performances (this year saw Robin Thicke attempt to sing his way with Chicago as much as Metallic playing with the Chinese classical pianist Lang Lang).

But really, can anyone of us keep our eyes off of what these people are wearing?

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Sure, it’s great to see The Beatles get their due…as many times as they do (certainly not enough by Grammy’s standards) and there were some very interesting staged moments to accompany pop hits we’ve all heard too many times already this year, but if the post wrap-up from T.V. talking heads or Monday morning quarterback fashion couture reviewers is any indication, really what our brightest and best are wearing is most important in the end.

Not they need our congrats, but we do salute the men and women of music this year (as well as others) as Von Gutenberg salutes any creative pursuit, be it new designs in latex catsuits, some super cool new tattoo Megan Massacre is inking on someone (see her as our cover girl in issue #8, available here: Apple Android Kindle ) any other pursuit our friends-readers-supporters get up into.

The fashion makes the music or the other way round? Does it matter?

Madonna

Sweet Miley Cyrus

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Less we forget, very much like Cary Grant growing in his popularity as a movie star more than he ever was an actor (and a good actor at that), Cap’n Crunch as much a commercial cartoon character as breakfast cereal that could rot your teeth the recent maligned Miley Cyrus is a pop personality before she really is a musician. So why could anyone be truly surprised, up in arms, offended even by her display the other night at the VMA’s, a show surely built on the shaky ground of visual pop-dom over musicianship.

Like it or leave that wagging foam finger and the girl’s granny-panties bikini, one fact is clear from our pov: the lady, ex Disney brand, Billy Ray Cyrus’ kid has every right to shake her thang in the camera to oversized teddy bears and into Robin Thicke’s crotch as much as she wants.

You might not recall-and I certainly wasn’t born yet to have seen it originally-but back in the day folks were enraged over Elvis’ gyrations (a man seen as a pop star more than ever a musician, which is a shame because he had a fantastic voice all the way up to the overweight jumpsuit end of his days) that Marilyn Monroe (cultural sex symbol more than ever an actress, which is sad seeing her comedic turn in “Some Like It Hot”) singing “Happy Birthday, Mr. Prez…i…denta”  to her lover JFK was seen as quite scandalous and God knows Madonna (like Miley and MTV darling at one time and certainly media whore to the nth degree) has seen her time or two on a stage (or in her overpriced SEX book) where people simply scratched their hands and said: “What he f***?

Like those tragic movie theater shootings, what I saw the other night of Miley shaking her thang has me saying “Why doesn’t stuff like this happen more often?” as opposed to “Why does it?” Being a pop star or a serial killer (and both get huge attention from our media) both need to truly make a statement in their endeavors to have any impact (that’s what makes serial killers and pop stars so dangerous…albeit one very much more so then the other).

But as I don’t and never would with a serial killer, I do in indeed applaud Billy Ray’s daughter’s bump-and-twerk, not because me thinks the actual gyrations all that good actually-I thought them quite lame-(I saw a posting online that said Cyrus’ “twerking is not working”)-but because I live in a country where a performer can still do ‘things like that’ but that ex-Hannah Montana knows enough at this point in the pop-star-more important then-musicianship state MTV has put us in that what she did the other night is exactly what is expected of our best and brightest.

You go girl.

Check what it’s all about here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrPGxRsaQvY

Just Look At What Katie Did!

If it’s all the same to you I won’t prattle on about my particular tastes when it comes to women’s lingerie (don’t you just hate it when blogs get personal?) but because of what we do here and that almost everyone seems to have, from hetero male, gay woman or man, casual fan of fashion and movie producers alike, some sort of passing interest in lingerie I thought it prudent to introduce to (or if you know of them already remind you of) the wonderful What Katie Did.

Founded in 1999 What Katie Did is ‘the world’s leading brand of faux vintage lingerie’. Popular stars/models and singers like Madonna, Patsy Kensit, Christina Hendericks and many others have worn What Katie Did pieces; the lines’ lingerie has been photographed by Mert & Marcus, Mario Testino and a long list of others, featured in Vogue, Sunday Times Style Magazine, V and too many others to name here and many mainstream movies, television shows and stage production have seen their characters clothed in designer and founder Katie Thomas’ productions.

Working from their ethical manufacturing facility in India for over a decade, Katie oversees new samples and production working so expertly at her craft that Cosmopolitan magazine nominated Katie Businesswoman of the Year in 2011.

What Katie Did sells every single stitch of any kind of vintage stuff you might like. There’s waist cinchers, corselettes and girdles (my personal fave…opps, I shouldn’t have said that aloud); under-and over-bust corsets and that spiral stitch bullet bra made famous by Michelle Williams in the movie My Week With Marilyn; seamed stockings made on vintage machinery and a full line of Besame Cosmetics.

You can visit the What Katie Did L.A. store at 7970 ½ Melrose Ave W. Hollywood or log on to their website here: http://www.whatkatiedid.us.com/products/lingerie, pluck out a few choice pieces of custom order a few of your own

Tell them Von Gutenberg sent you.

Pop Goes The World

Let’s face it, if you’re Rihanna you can’t tweet a picture of yourself wearing a Rolling Stones tee chosen from super-cool London fashion clothier River Island, then a month later reveal to Ryan Seacrest a desire to design clothes without people wondering if indeed you are going to do just that and if it might indeed be for River Island. It was no surprise then that come mid-summer we learned that a range of ’street to chic’ clothing based on the super-popular singer’s wardrobe and made from her choices is indeed going to hit the High Street shop’s shelves come Spring 2003.

“I find London really inspiring and River Island loves to have fun with clothes. I’m looking forward to working with them and creating something really special,” Rihanna said about her proposed RiRi Island designs.

Of course pop stars have been contributing clothing lines for a while now; Beyonce’s House of Dereon, the various Jennifer Lopez creations and even Madonna and her daughter’s junior line and though this new partnership seems to be a can’t miss I know we all tend to view these fashion match-ups (good, bad or indifferent) with more than a little trepidation.

Though River Island’s chief executive Ben Lewis assures us all:

“We are thrilled to be collaborating with Rihanna and to be the first fashion brand to work with her in this way.”

Most people are not built like, would ever look like or even on their best day could ever wish to wear clothes, have their hair and make-up come out as good as our stars do. While we all want to emulate celebs and come to think wearing outfits they have either designed or resemble the ones they wear might bring us that much closer to these people we adore and envy, wearing a RiRi top will not make you Rhianna…though that is the underlying promise of a fashion designer marrying a line with a pop star. If the clothes happen to be cool though, if they are made well and carry a unique style, then all the more power to Rhianna or anyone who attempts this.
We’ll all see in Spring ’13.

Hey, check out our own couture Facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Von-Gutenberg-Couture/198437400176423

Being Madonna

Madonna was recently in the news for something she said…again. Live on stage during her recent tour the Material Girl made some remarks seemingly in support of President Obama but some of the statement, which Madonna later claimed was her attempt at irony, was taken by quite a few people literally and saw Madonna get some flack.

Love her, like her, one thing is true, Madonna continues to make news.

In a career spanning more than a quarter of a decade the Michigan native has done one thing above most well in her time in the public eye…keeping herself in the public eye. Hitting the world by storm it was as much the rubber thin bracelets and lace the curvy 20-something girl first wore as her infectious dance hits that brought Madonna her initial fame. If you court public attention through your image as much as Madonna (or another one-named music artist like Prince) does-actually as any pop star needs to-you need to keep that imagine constantly a ‘changing…and Madonna has. Her look has evolved, morphed, appropriated and at times, led fashion and styles as we’ve watched her dress-and undress-across video, stage and even in her infamous SEX book and has been as carefully orchestrated as any album she has ever released.

Not so much a fan of her music (I think her songs are well-constructed pop dance ditties, they have just never been my cup of tea) I did happen to attend one live Madonna show once in my life at Madison Square Garden a decade ago. I knew the ‘show’ part of the show would be amazing, and Madonna spared no expense on dancers, band and effects but I was blown away by the scope of what she managed, built as much around her costume changes as her song choices.

Madonna has learned to manipulate her look like a master, better in fact then lots of modern day famous fashion designers outfit their models. For her music and fashion are linked, which is as it always has been for the very best pop stars, but where so many burn out in a magnesium flash not knowing enough to reinvent their look every six months Lady Madge is always stretching for the next best thing.

Living in the public eye must be exhausting but Madonna literally seems to eat it up. Whether she’s reading the Kabbalah, speaking with a slight English accent, directing movies, writing children’s books or simply being Madonna one thing is true about this lady: Madonna keeps up with her own fashion and her fashion (clothes, music, attitude) is always interesting.

 

To Be Beyoncé For A Day

There’s no mistaking the connection between fashion and pop-ular music. It’s been there from the days of Elvis’ first gyrations to Carnaby-street frockery in mid-60’s London, to the glam styles of Bowie and his ilk in the 70’s, Madonna, Prince and Michael Jackson a decade later and right up to now with those new pics of indie rocker Christopher Owens taken by Hedi Slimane for Saint Laurent Paris.

No one will ever accuse super popular songstress Beyoncé of not styling every second of her day, but when the lady and Jay-Z-and their new baby Blue Ivey-were all spotted recently on her vacation, as well as her b’day celebration, wouldn’t you know magazines not only reported the sightings and showed the pics, but to be sure we found out right quick about the lady’s cute little shorts outfit (along with a $500 dollar Jil Sander Varsity Lettered Sweater) and then her Gucci Oshibana Print Gathered Pants and ultra-cool Ray Bans.

Sure the Beyoncé’s, Madonna’s, Lenny Kravitz’s of this world (even pop/rock stars seemingly not so concerned with fashion like Bruce Springsteen) are aware that when they step out in public they invite scrutiny as well as paparazzi. As my dear old dad is fond of opining, being in the public eye is part of a celebrity’s job, I just wonder who is ultra aware of what they are wearing and who just dresses super cool because they can afford to and like the clothes?

Or is it in Beyonce’’s case a matter of all these factors together?

Either way, we like watching our hippest, handsomest, most talented (or at least most popular) act as human clothes racks for us. It gives us a chance to dream, ‘what if I was in their place’ and a perfect opportunity for new fashions to get a good public airing.

Latex the latest Diva addiction

Von Gutenberg Magazine follows the latest addiction of the Divas very closely, Madonna, Beyonce or Lady Gaga. They all look stunning!

While the pantsless trend of 2009 is still going strong, there seems to be another sexually charged trend taking place among American pop stars in 2010: latex clothing. While getups made of the slick material aren’t exactly new (think: Madonna, Grace Jones, Lil’ Kim), the trend returns this year with the current crop of copycat-happy entertainers, including Lady Gaga, Beyoncé, Rihanna, Ke$ha and, most recently, Christina Aguilera, all wearing the gear (Shakira and Ciara are next, trust us). And, because originality isn’t really the point anymore, most of the ladies are even wearing the exact same designer: Atsuko Kudo, a couture latex- and fetish-clothing designer from Japan who won the European Fetish Award for Best Fetish Design in 2008 and 2009. (Yeah, it was our first time learning about that award, too.)

Which diva pulls off the latex look the best?

Source: http://nymag.com/daily/fashion/2010/04/latex_slideshow.html 

Latex the latest Diva addiction

Von Gutenberg Magazine follows the latest addiction of the Divas very closely, Madonna, Beyonce or Lady Gaga. They all look stunning!

While the pantsless trend of 2009 is still going strong, there seems to be another sexually charged trend taking place among American pop stars in 2010: latex clothing. While getups made of the slick material aren’t exactly new (think: Madonna, Grace Jones, Lil’ Kim), the trend returns this year with the current crop of copycat-happy entertainers, including Lady Gaga, Beyoncé, Rihanna, Ke$ha and, most recently, Christina Aguilera, all wearing the gear (Shakira and Ciara are next, trust us). And, because originality isn’t really the point anymore, most of the ladies are even wearing the exact same designer: Atsuko Kudo, a couture latex- and fetish-clothing designer from Japan who won the European Fetish Award for Best Fetish Design in 2008 and 2009. (Yeah, it was our first time learning about that award, too.)

Which diva pulls off the latex look the best?

Source: http://nymag.com/daily/fashion/2010/04/latex_slideshow.html 

Lady Gaga in fetish wear simply looks stunning

bildeErik von Gutenberg recommends Lady Gaga! She is simply stunning!

Decadent dance pop diva-in-training Lady Gaga took over Joe Louis Arena Tuesday night with the same might and will with which she’s hijacked pop music over the last year-plus. The 23-year-old born Stefani Germanotta came armed with an array of hits and a daring 100-minute performance art spectacle, fit for a gallery space but blown up to arena proportions. The show drew from a host of influences from across the pop culture landscape, but the end product was thoroughly Gaga.

Her Monster’s Ball outing — originally set for the Fox Theatre but moved to the Joe in a last-minute switch due to production concerns — was like Madonna’s Blond Ambition tour filtered through Kanye West’s Glow in the Dark outing, as directed by Andy Warhol. The stage was set on an angled ramp and was entirely framed by a white border, so as to resemble a piece of art come to life.

Gaga was joined intermittently by as many as 10 backup dancers but often appeared alone, and proved she could carry a stage whether singing, dancing or playing piano while standing atop its bench. She gleefully toyed with the performer/ audience dynamic, alternately begging for the audience’s approval and acting as though she didn’t need it. At one point, she lay down in the corner of the stage and compared herself to Tinker Bell, the fairy from “Peter Pan.” “Tinker Bell will die if you don’t clap for her. Do you want me to DIE?” she asked the crowd of 8,000 strong. “Scream for me!” (Later, her use for her fans seemed to run out as she mock-killed the audience using a fake machine gun.)

She needn’t have worried about the level of audience love. Gaga’s fans — or “monsters,” as she calls them — provided her with plenty of adoration, as many came dressed in their finest Gaga attire. In a dazzling show of devotion, fans came dressed in leather, glitter, sparkles, face paint, short skirts and body suits, a level of mimicry that recalled fans at early Madonna concerts.

Of course few outfits were as daring as Gaga’s, who dressed in a series of leather ensembles that somehow always seemed to accentuate her backside. She switched between bodysuits, fetish wear and tops made out of mirror balls, and came out in a light-up suit during the opener, “Dance in the Dark,” that resembled something out of “Tron.”

Gaga’s persona is a complex commentary on the crossroads of fame and celebrity, though there’s a genuine authenticity at play that keeps her from venturing into parody. Her refreshingly imperfect vocals were a reminder that she was singing into a live microphone throughout the show, and though the concert was tightly choreographed, there was always the danger that it could careen at any given moment into uncharted territory.

She worked Detroit and her trip to the Garden Bowl Monday night into her often R-rated stage banter, and made a plea for “gay marriage in 2010!” during “Boys Boys Boys.” The show’s boldest moment came during “Paparazzi,” when Gaga’s hair was tied to two rings that slid along a track attached to a pole, held up by two of her backup dancers. Not quite sure what it meant, but it was impossible to look away from.

That’s Gaga’s greatest strength: Her ability to make you stop and stare. Now that she’s proven she can captivate audiences at the arena level this early in her career, the question is, where does she go from here? Can she get any bigger? The answer is uncertain, but just try looking away as she figures it out.

Source: http://www.detnews.com/article/20100113/ENT04/1130392/1424/ENT04/Lady-Gaga-sparkles-in-monster-Detroit-show#ixzz0ceLXHl9F